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Breede Valley Genesis Project: Provincial Government of the Western Cape

Catalytic Project: Worcester Urban Framework & CBD Rejuvenation
Compiled by the Civil-Society Ad Hoc Committee

Introduction

Within the ambit of the Genesis Project, as commissioned by PGWC (Provincial Government Western Cape) in conjunction with the Breede Valley Municipality (BVM), a civil-society committee was tasked to take the Genesis Project to the next level, by involving stakeholders in the community to articulate catalytic projects, which will kick-start the economy. Although the catalytic project in itself will not generate a direct income, the project aims to generate economic growth and social cohesion as a result of its targeted impact on the town of Worcester.

Two priority projects were identified; Kleinplasie upgrade: tourist node for the Breede River Valley and gateway to Route 62. The other is contained within this document, the Worcester urban framework and CBD (central business district) rejuvenation.

Problem Statement

Social cohesion, the entrenched Apartheid urban construct, social and economic decay and capital flight are seen as the biggest issues facing the urban core of Worcester. The following articulates these problems and their resultant impact on the CBD and surrounding neighbourhoods:

Economic Factors:

  • Decentralisation of investment away from the Worcester CBD
  • Capital flight to the Mountain Mill precinct and even exiting the valley altogether
  • Resultant property value stagnation/reduction and subsequent erosion of the tax-base
  • Lack of investment feeding unemployment and lack of opportunities
  • Informal sector exclusion and difficulty of micro-small enterprises to operate in the CBD

Social Factors:

  • Safety is compromised, with crime and grime steadily increasing
  • Social ills, such as homelessness, begging and prostitution are becoming endemic
  • Worcester’s urban area looks unsightly when compared to other Winelands towns; causing lack of civic-pride and deincentivising civic responsibility
  • Worcester remains a very divided town along racial and socio-economic lines

Urban-Spatial Factors:

  • Urban open-areas are poorly maintained, thus making them undesirable for community use
  • Worcester is NMT (non-motorised transport) unfriendly: increases travel-costs for the poorest communities; creates parking issues; reduces foot-traffic; causes increased CO2 emissions
  • Aesthetic guidelines are non-existent, eroding the urban aesthetic and town heritage
  • Freight and long-distance traffic holds the urban core hostage; dangerous/unpleasant for pedestrians, expensive for municipal road upkeep
  • Retail diversity is shrinking; spending power taken elsewhere
  • Urban infrastructure, incl. street lighting, landscaping, pavements, roads are unattractive, often in state of decay
  • Urban connectivity is poor; neighbourhoods are disjointed, entrenching the Apartheid urban construct
  • Tourism economy in underperforming; no incentive to stop/stay in Worcester

Capacity Factors:

  • Municipal management (some individuals) are community and business unfriendly; discourages investment and are problem, rather than solution orientated
  • Private and public sector not unified; distrust is commonplace with communication and common vision lacking
  • Due to economic stagnation, local businesses often lack capital to initiate public-service initiatives
  • BVM has no money to fix the root-causes of why they have no money: viscous cycle!

The CBD: The Catalyst

The catalytic project can be divided into two broad sub-projects, one: the rejuvenation of the Worcester CBD and two: the destruction of the Apartheid urban construct through a comprehensive urban framework.

Why is the Worcester CBD so pivotal? It is the only glue that binds previously advantaged and disadvantaged communities together. It is the only part of the urban entity that is centrally located that can bridge the social and spatial divide. It is also the place within the Breede Valley Municipality (BVM) that has the most employment and enterprise-creation potential, the best relative infrastructure and most urban development potential that is yet, unrealised.

Why have we not focused only on manufacturing and attracting industry? Industries will not invest in a town in the Western Cape if it is sub-par. If the urban entity is fragmented, in a state of decay and the historical and aesthetic value below-average, industry will locate itself in other regional towns, like Paarl, Robertson, Stellenbosch etc. Captains of industry have families, wives/husbands and high-order needs. With the Western Cape presenting such a rich plethora of lifestyle choices for rural-living, if Worcester cannot compete with its counterparts, it will fail to attract investment.

Without a vibrant urban core, an increasing tax-base and sound urban management, the Breede Valley Municipality (BVM) will remain resource-poor, precluding bulk-infrastructural investment. This has already resulted in AfriGlass not investing in Worcester as BVM could not meet their infrastructural needs at a fair price to the company. A CBD is the engine that keeps the car, which is the regional economy, running. Without the engine, having an effective radiator means little. Addressing the CBD’s ills addresses the root cause of many issues, unlocking solutions for other underlying problems.

The CBD: The Social Glue

Worcester, as with most South African towns, has the Apartheid legacy to deal with and its separatist urban planning which kept communities apart. This has kept areas of job-creation and opportunity far from the communities that need it most. It has already created a separatist urban fabric, where places of work, shop and play become enclaves within their respective communities, rather than fostering a melting pot of cultures and ethnicities in one beautiful and safe urban playground for all.

The current status of the Worcester urban construct sees Durban/Russell Streets as a dividing line between the previously White north and the previously Coloured south. Here, the CBD is actually the part of the town that keeps population groups separated. The previously African area of Zwelethemba has been kept isolated by the industrial area, Hex River and R60. The wealthiest areas are distally to the far north and west and the poorest areas, to the far south and east. The only logical node that can bridge this divide, most proximal to the furthest points of structural division, is the CBD. Another geographically suitable area is the Industrial Area, but is not the correct urban environment or zoning to psychologically bridge the ethnic divide.

If the CBD is allowed to decay further, the only logical mixing-area will be compromised. The place that is spatially best-suited to foster social cohesion and economic growth will become an area of decay; capital flight, unsafe streets and social ills breeds social instability and community distrust. This cannot be allowed to happen. If no intervention takes place in the CBD, it could become a social, spatial and economic wedge that divides the town further; if a positive intervention happens, the CBD becomes the social, spatial and economic glue.

Figure A: An ethnicity and income overview of Worcester and logical “bridging” zone

Figure A: An ethnicity and income overview of Worcester and logical “bridging” zone. Reminder of the Apartheid urban construct we need to obliterate.

The CBD: Historic Core and Economic Catalyst

The Western Cape is unique in a South African context, in that much of the “pull” that towns exert on investment, has to do with their lifestyle qualities, aesthetic attractiveness and heritage value. Obviously, this does not exclude the universal factors, like access to markets, skills, quality of infrastructure and investment climate; however, the rural Western Cape has additional criterion towns in other provinces may not be held to. A town in the Winelands that compares poorly to its surrounding urban competitors will see itself losing out on investment, tourism-spend and property development.

Worcester’s primary tangible asset is its beautiful surroundings; its secondary asset is the heritage and architecture of its historic core, located primarily within the CBD, with Church Street requiring a particular mention.  However, this asset is being mismanaged, actually damaged, by urban decay and social ills creeping into the historic core.

We need not travel far to observe case studies in the Western Cape where inner-town revitalisation translates into economic growth and acts as an incentive for investment. Stellenbosch has an extremely attractive CBD, with the historic core acting as a lifestyle hub for the town. Companies and industries with money to spend will not invest if their executives’ and employees’ lifestyle, retail needs, educational and entertainment requirements are not met. Thus, numerous companies in finance, liquor, tobacco and international NGO’s have chosen to base themselves in Stellenbosch. Many other large corporations in the food and printing industry have based themselves Paarl. In many respects, Stellenbosch has Andringa, Church and Ryneveld Streets to thank; Paarl has Main Road to thank.

Worcester remains an afterthought; addressing the Worcester CBD will change our rank as “lesser to the western Winelands,” to “inland Winelands capital of equal stature.” We should be able to thank Church and High Streets in the future, but not yet. Our overlooked status is a proven fact, as contained within the Breede Valley Municipality’s IDP (Integrated Development Plan), showing the valley’s economy as consistently growing at a 1% slower pace than the Cape Winelands District average and the gap has been steadily widening. Thus, without intervention, the problem will continue to worsen.

The tourism sector is one of the largest employers in the Western Cape. The Breede River Valley has missed the boat. The ever-popular Route 62 meets the N1 in Worcester, yet the valley is mostly passed by. Rather than stopping in Worcester, tourists are annoyed by its traffic lights being in the way of their need to get to Robertson or the Garden Route and Klein-Karoo beyond. This cannot be remedied by forcing tourists to stop; it can only be done by creating “the want to linger longer.” The N1 bypasses Paarl, yet it is infinitely more prosperous than Beaufort West that sees the N1 going straight through the heart of town. A petrol-station sale does not prosperity make.

Unlocking the potential to create a vibrant, attractive and safe historic core within the CBD will bring the local shoppers back into town, it will keep the tourists in the valley and it will incentivise companies and industries to base themselves here.

The Role of Mountain Mill

Mountain Mill is as much the saviour of Worcester, as Century City is the saviour of Cape Town; it simply, is not. In the heritage rich Western Cape, where history, natural beauty and lifestyle are huge factors, a faux representation of urbanity does not yield extensive or inclusive results.

Mountain Mill does indeed have a place in the valley as a decentralised regional convenience shopping node and external business hub. However, it cannot replace the Worcester CBD and in fact, without intervention, could be its downfall. Just as the Cape Town CBD acknowledged the decentralisation threat posed by Century City, Claremont and TygerValley, Worcester CBD must acknowledge this similar threat. Once the issues are addressed, the external node becomes complementary to the CBD, rather than a threat. Ignoring the issue may cause the slow death of the urban core.

Mountain Mill should serve the shopping and business needs of regional residents, Breede River Valley and adjacent Western Cape interior; the Worcester CBD should serve the shopping and business needs of local residents, cater to tourists and regional leisure and entertainment seekers. From a spatial and social point-of-view, Mountain Mill could never unite the town; by virtue of where it is located, it is isolationist.

NMT: Corridors of Improvement and Movement

Addressing the urban fabric of the entire urban area, utilising the CBD as focal point, NMT (non-motorised transport) needs to be prioritised in the urban limits of Worcester. Climate Change is a real issue and could have a huge impact on the Western Cape’s agricultural sector, putting the local economy in jeopardy. There is no reason why motorised transport is prioritised within an urban entity that is only 8.5km (east-west) by 6.5km (north-south) from its furthest extents.

However, making the CBD attractive to pedestrian traffic means making it safe, clean and aesthetically pleasing; having poor landscaping and lighting, uneven and unmaintained pavements, no street-furniture and a crime and grime problem will always deter pedestrians from walking the streets. This exacerbates the parking problem; even though Worcester has a better parking-ratio compared to other major Winelands towns. Parking would never be such a contentious issue if residents found walking in the CBD’s urban environment pleasurable. Why the desperation to seek immediate, adjacent parking if the walking environment is excellent.

The poorest residents spend too much on taxi fare. It is simply not necessary, as with the CBD being within 4.5km of the furthest township, Zwelethemba, if dedicated NMT routes were in place, the town centre would be accessible to all. Currently, roads are narrow and completely pedestrian and bike unfriendly, leaving poor residents with few options. Avian Park also has tremendous accessibility issues, particularly in winter when all informal foot and bike paths are muddied and flooded.

The CBD should be seen as the hub and NMT-routes as the spokes; along all these routes, a philosophy of corridors of improvement and movement should be applied to spread the urban-environmental gains of the CBD to numerous neighbourhoods throughout Worcester

Solving the Problems

Economic Factors:

  • Decentralisation of investment away from the Worcester CBD

Good urban management incentivises investment by private property owners.

  • Capital flight to the Mountain Mill precinct and even exiting the valley altogether

Vibrant CBD attracts residents, tourists and businesses back to it. Mountain Mill becomes complementary instead of a threat.

  • Resultant property value stagnation/reduction and subsequent erosion of the tax-base

Additional investment boosts property values; more into municipal coffers.

  • Lack of investment feeding unemployment and lack of opportunities

New business and increases tourism arrivals boosts job-creation, diversifies economic mix.

  • Informal sector exclusion and difficulty of micro-small enterprises to operate in the CBD

Formally including the informal sector, creating markets and managing traders adds value to the sector and fosters trust between the formal and informal sector.

Social Factors:

  • Safety is compromised, with crime and grime steadily increasing

Urban management system appoints additional (CID – city improvement district) security and cleaning staff.

  • Social ills, such as homelessness, begging and prostitution are becoming endemic

Social responsibility partners/programs and cooperation between CID security staff and SAPS will reduce social ills.

  • Worcester’s urban area looks unsightly when compared to other Winelands towns; causing lack of civic-pride and deincentivising civic responsibility

Upgrading the CBD will give Worcester a desperately needed make-over and improve its aesthetic competitiveness.

  • Worcester remains a very divided town along racial and socio-economic lines

Bringing the majority of public-works projects to the CBD benefits more people in more neighbourhoods, as it lies at the spatial heart and crossroads of all of Worcester’s communities.

Urban-Spatial Factors:

  • Urban open-areas are poorly maintained, thus making them undesirable for community use

Upgrading and urban management will address this and give Worcesterites an urban asset.

  • Worcester is NMT (non-motorised transport) unfriendly: increases travel-costs for the poorest communities; creates parking issues; reduces foot-traffic; causes increased CO2 emissions

NMT-routes need to be constructed to take cars off the roads and link communities together; give them access to economic heart of the valley.

  • Aesthetic guidelines are non-existent, eroding the urban aesthetic and town heritage

Urban management under the CID and Partnership can impose aesthetic guidelines for property owners within its management area. This boosts the town’s heritage and aesthetic value, boosting the attractiveness to additional retail and touristic development.

  • Freight and long-distance traffic holds the urban core hostage; dangerous/unpleasant for pedestrians, expensive for municipal road upkeep

Worcester Eastern Bypass construction and the effective policing of freight traffic in CBD will aid in making the CBD pedestrian friendly and reduce the municipality’s repair and maintenance bill.

  • Retail diversity is shrinking; spending power taken elsewhere

More foot traffic in CBD, more diverse shoppers (residents and tourists) and a well-managed urban entity will bring retail investment back.

  • Urban infrastructure, incl. street lighting, landscaping, pavements, roads are unattractive, often in state of decay

CID with the Partnership and municipality will steadily upgrade the urban infrastructure reversing the decay.

  • Urban connectivity is poor; neighbourhoods are disjointed, entrenching the Apartheid urban construct

New NMT-routes throughout town and a vibrant CBD will begin to bridge the divide and unite the town, creating one, diverse, safe and economically thriving urban hub.

  • Tourism economy in underperforming; no incentive to stop/stay in Worcester

A diversified retail and restaurant offering in an attractive, heritage-rich town will encourage visitors to stay in Worcester and entice Route 62 and N1 motorists to consider the town as a destination, not a “pass through place.”

Capacity Factors:

  • Municipal management (some individuals) are community and business unfriendly; discourages investment and are problem, rather than solution orientated

Some individuals need to be coached on laying out the red carpet, rather that bringing in the red tape. Those who habitually hamper investment and antagonises businesses and residents without good reason should unfortunately be relieved of their duties.

  • Private and public sector not unified; distrust is commonplace with communication and common vision lacking

Private-Public Partnership (Breede Valley Partnership) will address these issues effectively by bringing all stakeholders to one table.

  • Due to economic stagnation, local businesses often lack capital to initiate public-service initiatives

A CBD that is economically jump-started will bring prosperity to private business, increasing their capacity to participate in uplifting the town and obviously, will create more jobs.

  • BVM has no money to fix the root-causes of why they have no money: viscous cycle!

Launching catalytic projects that will facilitate economic spin-offs and the Partnership will increase the revenue-base and facilitate the economic quantum leap the valley requires.

Policy Alignment

  • PGWC Department of Transport and Public Works has a policy to build fewer roads and to prioritse the development of NMT and public-transit infrastructure. The CBD revitalistion, pedestrianisation and NMT corridors of improvement and movement facilitate these objectives; however a variance on policy may be required to facilitate the “Worcester Orbital” to make the full, practical implementation of this policy possible in the urban entity.
  • PGWC Department of Economic Development and Tourism has a policy to facilitate increased growth in agri-processing and diversifying the agricultural sector. The Breede Valley Municipal area is responsible for 20% of the viticultural output of the province. If the urban economic engine is allowed to collapse in an area which is agri-focused, the agricultural sector may follow suit. Agri-processing and support industries are already Stellenbosch-Paarl-centric; if Worcester does not attain similar economic importance, the industry will continue to shun the town and Breede Valley region; thereby increasing the local region’s investment push-factor and improve the western-Winelands pull-factor.
  • PGWC has a cross-departmental policy of promoting public-private partnerships. The establishment of the Breede Valley Partnership will increase the intellectual and leadership capacity locally, increase business participation in local economic growth initiatives and link government to civil-society, facilitating mutual trust, vision and the speedy implementation of targeted interventions. It will also
  • The PGWC and City of Cape Town has also spearheaded the Violence Prevention through Urban Upgrading campaign in Khayelitsha. This Catalytic Project aligns with the outcomes of this campaign.
  • The PGWC has a new initiative, Red Tape to Red Carpet. Partnerships facilitate this, by allowing local authorities to make rapid decisions, implement delivery speedily and expedite urban management projects through a Section 21 Company, circumventing the cumbersome and restrictive MFMA (Municipal Finance Management Act) legally within the AG’s (Auditor General) framework.
  • National Treasury has an infrastructure-build policy, using investment in national assets to facilitate economic growth and job-creation during tumultuous economic times. Of this, Already R1.5billion has been earmarked for additional provincial road infrastructure-spend as a conditional grant. R2.5billion goes to local municipalities for public transport and other infrastructure.  This Catalytic Project aligns with these objectives, improving infrastructure that will improve the economy and local tax-base and increase NMT-use.
  • National government has, since 1994, had a policy of urban infill and urban development initiatives that aims to densify urban entities, contains urban sprawl and destroys the Apartheid urban construct.
  • The PGWC will form the EDA (Economic Development Agency) in March 2012.  This agency earmarks the N1 corridor from the Huguenot Tunnel to Three Sisters as the central provincial growth corridor. The only high-order town (according to the University of Stellenbosch’s Rural Town’s Economic Potential Study) is Worcester along this route; Worcester must anchor the central provincial growth corridor. Failure to prioritise Worcester could scupper economic development along this entire corridor.

Economic Methodology – Maps

"Economic

Figure C: Threats Map: Western Cape

Figure C: Threats Map: Western Cape

 

Project Phasing

Although a sledge-hammer approach of implementing the entire project in one giant construction project to transform the town completely may sound ideal, the reality is budgets will more than likely be unable to support this. The total project cost approximation may be R3.5billion is 2012 Rands to implement completely, including arterial road construction and NMT routes. That said; one needs to prioritse which project is most likely to have the most rapid impact on getting the CBD’s economic heart beating again. This phase is priorised for rapid implementation and all other phases feed into the long-term objectives, extending the gains to other urban areas within Worcester.

Thus, the proposed phasing and timeline for this catalytic project:

2012 ↓

  • January 2012: Inception of the Breede Valley Partnership (BVP) – cross-sectoral cooperation, urban management and urban planning commences immediately; Initial 5-Year Plan revealed
  • February 2012-July 2012: Public participation process in the establishment of the SRA’s (Special Rating Areas)
  • March 2012: Worcester CBD branding on street signage commences, light-pole banners heralds the public arrival of the BVP
  • March 2012: Historic Core Project: Church Street pseudo-pedistrianisation & Church Square receive inter-governmental support and funding is unlocked
  • April 2012: Designs for project finalised; Non-local freight traffic barred from CBD roads
  • May 2012: Urban Framework is concluded in cooperation with the BVM
  • June 2012 Construction commences on the Historic Core Project
  • July 2012: NMT routes are designed
  • August 2012: SRA vote takes place, official establishment of the CID’s (City Improvement Districts) – CBD and Industrial Area. Aesthetic guidelines and bylaws implemented. Social upliftment projects launched
  • September: NMT routes to Avian Park and Zwelethemba are prioritised.
  • October 2012: Finalisation of the plan for the Worcester Eastern Bypass (new R60 alignment); construction of Porter Street taxi-rank commences
  • October 2012: After Breedekloof Festival 2012, tourism entities are amalgamated; new valley-wide festival announced to coincide with Kleinplasie phase 1 launch
  • November 2012: Process begins to unlock funding for phase 1 of NMT routes
  • December 2012: SRA investigations begin for the south-CBD (Durban Rd corridor)

2013 ↓

  • January 2013: Urban management levels assessment of CBD/industrial Area; gains/failures articulated
  • March 2013: NMT funding for phase 1 is unlocked
  • April 2013: Historic Core construction complete – new informal market launched; construction commences on NMT Phase 1
  • May 2013: Project design begins for High Street Urban Upgrade
  • June 2013: Public-spaces framework kicks in resulting in Worcester-wide improvement in urban-open-areas; Queens Plein project design commences
  • July 2013: Project scoping begins on ZweleVostile Express: commuter train from Zwelethemba to Worcester CBD using underutilised Roberson train line
  • August 2013: NMT Phase 2 project design begins: Fisher and Grey Street corridors
  • September 2013: R43 Western Arterial Link scoping begins
  • October 2013: Construction of the Worcester Eastern Bypass (R60 realignment) begins; Porter Street taxi-rank complete
  • November 2013: NMT Phase 2 applies for funding
  • December 2013: Inaugural street festival takes place on Church Street and Church Square to coincide with the switching-on of the Christmas lights

2014 ↓

  • January 2014: Scoping study begins for construction of the Southern Worcester road and NMT link; joins Avian Park; Hex Park; Zwelethemba and Industria to new R60 alignment
  • February 2014: Phase 2 of SRA’s are voted upon: potentially Durban-South CBD and Paglande
  • March 2014: Funding for Phase 2 NMT in unlocked
  • April 2014: High Street upgrade project design finalised and securing of funding begins
  • May 2014: Construction of NMT phase 1 complete; NMT phase 2 construction commences
  • June 2014: Queens Plein upgrade and re-landscaping begins
  • July 2014: ZweleVostile Express study and design complete
  • August 2014: Scoping for Phase 3 of SRA’s begin: De Doorns & Rawsonville (at this stage, PGWC’s upgrade of Van Riebeeck Street – Rawsonville will be complete)
  • September 2014: R43 Western Arterial Link scoping complete; design and budget alignment begins
  • October 2014: Additional pedestrian improvements in CBD commence with the design phase: Russell Street Bike corridor; Porter/Stockenström/Fairbairn/Riebeeck/Church (West) Streets
  • November 2014: NMT phase 3 (NMT Porter/NMT West/NMT Roux) applies for funding alongside ZweleVostile Express and Zwelethemba intermodal station; Queens Plein complete
  • December 2014: Street Festival 2

2015 ↓

  • January 2015: Design begins on Southern Worcester Road and NMT link
  • February 2015: Phase 3 of SRA’s voted upon: Rawsonville & De Doorns; urban management commences
  • March 2015: Funding for High Street Upgrade secured
  • April 2015: Construction of Worcester Eastern Bypass complete; NMT Phase 2 complete; High Street Upgrade commences construction
  • May 2015: Rawsonville & De Doorns towns branded and street-light banners erected
  • June 2015: Budgetary alignment secured for R43 Western Arterial Link from PGWC
  • August 2015: Design of other pedestrian improvements in CBD complete
  • September 2015: Funding for ZweleVostile project secured
  • October 2015: Construction of aforementioned project commences
  • November 2015: Russell Bike Corridor and other pedestrian improvement in CBD seeks funding
  • December 2015: Street Festival 3

2016 ↓

  • January 2016: Design begins of the civic centre revitalisation project
  • March 2016: Funding for NMT Phase 3 and Russell Bike Corridor secured
  • April 2016: High Street Upgrade complete; construction commences of NMT Phase 3 and Russell Bike Corridor
  • May 2016: Church Street (Baring to Riebeeck) becomes fully pedestrianised; local resident/business traffic only
  • June 2016: Construction of Southern Worcester Road and NMT link commences
  • July 2016: R43 Western Arterial Link begins construction; pedestrian improvements included to link Avian Park to Worcester-proper across this busy thoroughfare
  • September 2016: Funding secured for other CBD pedestrian improvements secured
  • November 2016: Russell Bike corridor nears completion as construction moves to other CBD construction improvements
  • December 2016: Street Festival 4

2017 ↓

  • January 2017:  Next 5-Year Plan unveiled; Partnership celebrates fifth anniversary
  • February 2017: Civic centre revitalisation project construction commences
  • April 2017: NMT Phase 3 and ZweleVostile project complete
  • May 2017: CBD pedestrian improvements complete
  • October 2017: Southern Worcester Road and NMT link complete
  • November 2017: R43 Western Arterial Link complete; NMT completely prioritised within the new completed “Worcester Orbital Roads.” Long-distance freight barred from travel within the orbital.
  • December 2017: Street Festival 5 expanded; CBD now a full pedestrian priority zone; speed limits reduced to 40km/h in core of CBD and speed calming introduced on all affected streets

2018 ↓

  • February 2018: Civic centre rehabilitation and revitalisation project complete
Worcester transportation framework: NMT & arterial routes

Worcester transportation framework: NMT & arterial routes

Worcester Orbital and NMT Scheme Proposal (above). Worcester Proposed Urban Framework, NMT and Arterial Route Projects

NOTE: All maps/design proposals are the intellectual property of 34°Design; Information is courtesy the Genesis Project Civil-Society Ad Hoc Committee, Provincial Government Western Cape – Dept. of Economic Development and Tourism; Univ. of Stellenbosch

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